900 Plus Unit Active Retirement Community Proposed for Former Fiserv Property

Comments (1) City Zoning & Special Use, Featured

Fiserv Property

United Peachtree Corners Civic Association held a land use meeting regarding plans for the former Fiserv property on Jan. 29 at the new City Hall. The meeting included a presentation of the proposed plans for the 115-acre property and a question and answer session.

Ty White

Ty White

Ty White, Founding President of the home builder company Peachland Homes, began the presentation by sharing the idea he and his investment partners (operating under the name East Jones Bridge Road LLC according to an Atlanta Journal-Constitution article) started to envision for the property in July 2017. White explained that the goal was to create a retirement community for active adults over age 55 and to emphasize wellness, sustainability, connectivity, technology and innovation throughout it.

When explaining how the group came to the idea of developing a retirement community White shared his own experience as a home builder and the interactions he says has had with people supposedly expressing a desire for the product his team is proposing. He also said, “It’s no secret that the biggest demographic, baby boomers, are now reaching an age where they’re saying, ‘What’s next?’ They’re becoming empty nesters and what they’re looking for has not been created in the market before.”

Citing the city’s 2033 Comprehensive Plan, White noted that by 2030 one in five residents will be over the age of 65, there are few housing options for empty nesters in Peachtree Corners currently, economic development opportunities for empty nesters exist, and that housing preferences are changing.

He then went on to share how the development of the community would be carried out, starting with an additional 50 foot enhanced buffer of fencing and Oak, Magnolia, Cypress and Cedar trees that would be added to the property line. Elevating the level of privacy for residents of the community and neighbors of the community would add to the group’s mission to create a “natural sanctuary retreat.” It also plans to leave 2/3 of the property in its current state.

To make the most of the existing topography and the tree canopy, “graduated height zones” would be established ranging from two to three, four to five, and six to seven stories. The highest zone would be the closest to the Chattahoochee River.

A rough rendering as shown in a recent AJC article.

There would also be a wide range of housing options in different sections of the property. Options would include single-family houses/cottages, townhomes, condos/lofts, and independent living/assisted living/memory care. Sizing of the 915 units is estimated to be from 1,000 to 3,000 square feet. One room in the assisted living center would count as one unit, with memory care being 100-250 units total. The options are expected to range in price from $300,000 to $600,000. Construction is expected to take three to five years and could begin in as soon as a year. There will be roughly 24 townhomes and 40-48 detached homes.

Half of the original building built by Simmons Mattresses is anticipated to be additional condos/lofts with the other half being used as a clubhouse, fitness center, etc. Parks will also be established within the community. Trails that have already been created on the property are planned to be utilized and possibly expanded.

White concluded by saying that the overall goal of the project is to create a modern empty nester/active adult community, to develop a use of the property that doesn’t tax schools, decreases the traffic over the current use, and embraces the city’s plan for 2033.

Miller then answered questions from the audience before the meeting adjourned. Topics addressed included:


Miller noted the group has had an independent traffic study done and it found that traffic could be reduced by 40-50 percent when compared to the area’s previous use for offices. Peak time travel could be cut by 2/3 to ¾ due to less traffic from the community during 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m.

Number of People in Each Unit

It is expected that 1 to 2 people will make up most of the units.


Some buildings will be built on pedestals to allow for parking underneath and existing parking lots will be utilized to minimize the impact on the surrounding green space. The group anticipates one parking space allotment per assisted living resident, no more than two spots for the independent housing options, and some guest parking. Townhomes will have garages and people will be encouraged to keep their cars in their garages.

Layout of Townhomes

Townhomes will be laid out traditionally with three stories but Miller reinforced the fact that for those who don’t want to use stairs, other housing options will be available.

Existing Structure

Two buildings will be torn down. All the property along the river will be saved including the Simmons Mattresses building. Miller noted the benefit of having existing structures to incorporate the amenities into, meaning they won’t be the last part of the project to be worked on since the space is already there.

Age Requirement

The group has made it a condition of its zoning that it will be a 55+ community. A master association will also cover the whole property and the covenant will restrict those under the age of 55. The desired age range will also be the focus of the design.

Assisted Living/Memory Care

Miller stated that the group would like to lead with the independent housing options not with assisted living—the goal being an active living community versus a Continuing Care Retirement Community. He also noted that if the market demand shifts away from assisted living, the facility may not be built. More single-family homes or condos could be built instead if the facility is not built.

Construction Timeline

The project is expected to take three to five years to complete and will be built in phases. Miller explained that sales and marketing would also be a big factor into how fast the project will be completed.


The group has spoken with city staff and civic associations about trails. Miller stated that they are open to working toward what the city and neighborhood want.

Property Oversight

A professionally run association would most likely be hired and paid for by the owners to oversee the community, similar to a homeowners association.

Gated Community

This is a possibility. Twenty-four hour security will be provided.

City Council and UPCCA declined to comment on the plans for the property at the time of this story.

One Response to 900 Plus Unit Active Retirement Community Proposed for Former Fiserv Property

  1. RBJonesy says:

    the Simmons Building is one of the most unique office developments in all of Atlanta–not necessarily due to the architecture, but the site planning and site design. The office parking lot is weaved in and out of the existing forest. The amount of trees preserved on site shows that good development was possible even in the late 1970s and 80s. It is obvious the development community has learned nothing in the interim. The Simmons portion of the site, including the building by THW and the park-like entry roads and parking, designed by Robert Marvin’s firm, should be preserved and not altered.




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